Archive for the ‘Gone’ Category

300 West Hastings Street

We saw the Inns of Court building that once stood here in an earlier post. From the 1890s offices for lawyers were here because the Courthouse was next door – where today the park of Victory Square is located. When we posted the Inns of Court comparison, the ‘after’ shot showed the 1950 Bank of Commerce designed by McCarter Nairne – one of the earliest modernist structures in the city. At the time it was one of a number of buildings occupied by the Vancouver Film School, and it’s seen here at the end of 2014, not long before it was demolished, and below in 1981.

It was replaced earlier this year with a rental residential building developed by Simon Fraser University, with a floor of educational space and a café on the main floor. Designed by Raymond Letkeman Architects, it used a hybrid construction method of concrete frame for the lower floors and woodframe for the upper residential floors, all clad in brick.

Image source: City of Vancouver Archives  CVA 779-E11.20.

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Posted November 20, 2017 by ChangingCity in Gone, Victory Square

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823 and 827 Union Street

The Strathcona building on the left of our 1973 image was once a laundry. There’s an earlier image (on the left), said to have been shot some time after 1960, showing that use. We think it’s probably as earlier image, from the 1950s. The Laundry was constructed in 1911 – there are three different permits, and the laundry operator’s name is slightly different in each. The permits were issued for 823 Barnard, but by the time they were built it was 823 Union Street. The street directory says it was operated as Yee Yat’s laundry, but George Dunlap was the builder for either To Lo Wang, or To Loy Wing (the more likely name).

Next door, at 827 was the Standard Glass Co, built in 1910. There are two permits here – an initial $1,000 proposal for a store and then a more expensive $3,000 version which added both a store and dwelling house, which was the developed building (still standing today). This was designed by E Stanley Mitton for H M Thompson, and built by F M Parr and Sons. Henry M Thompson was secretary and treasurer of the glass company, and lived on York Avenue.

Standard Glass actually did work that was anything but standard. The firm was founded in 1909 or 1910 by Charles Bloomfield, the most experienced glass artisan in the city at that time. Bloomfield, his brother James, and father Henry founded the province’s first art and stained glass business, Henry Bloomfield and Sons, in New Westminster in 1891. Burned out by the great fire of 1898 they moved to Vancouver. James was a talented artist and glass designer who trained in the United States and England between 1896 and 1898. In 1904 he decided that prospects for quality stained and art glass work in the city were limited and the firm broke up. Charles acquired some of the technical and artistic expertise of his brother and carried this experience into the firms which he subsequently worked for and the one which he founded and managed in this building, Standard Glass. Charles initially lived upstairs, over the production space, although not for long.

By 1914 there were ‘foreigners’ in the first two houses on the block to the west of here, Yee Yet’s laundry, and Rothstein Bros, junk dealers had replaced Standard Glass. Charles Bloomfield was working elsewhere as foreman of the Western Plate Glass & Importing Co, and living on Yew Street. By 1916 almost the entire north side of the block was vacant, except for Yee Yick’s laundry, and ‘foreigners’ at 817. The two buildings stayed empty for many years. By 1924 827 was occupied by W Coste upstairs, with the Atlas Rubber Co on the main floor, but the laundry at 823 was still vacant. (Lawrence Coste was a salesman with Atlas Rubber).

By the end of the 1920s the laundry had reopened as the City Laundry, Chinese were living upstairs, and the Buckingham Chair Works was in the back of 823. Next door was residential on both floors – listed as ‘Chinese’. Chinese residents continued to occupy 827; in 1955 it was Low Chew and Low Sing. In 823 BC Paper Excelsior operated: tragedy struck a year later when fire broke out in the living space behind the works: Oliver Beaulieu, the proprietor, died in the blaze, as well as Harvey Markel, a visitor. A third man escaped through a basement window. From the state of the property in 1973 it may never have been occupied after that. The narrow Vancouver special that replaced the building was built in 1974.

Image sources: City of Vancouver Archives CVA 808-27 and CVA 780-332

 

 

700 block Homer Street – west side

We saw the building on the right of this image in an earlier post. Until recently it was home to Budget Car Rental: as this 1981 image shows the company operated on this lot for many years. Now you have to go to the airport to hire a Budget vehicle: the site is intended to have a new office tower built in the near future. As early as 1920 this was public parking – C A Hughes obtained a building permit for the southern end of the Budget lot for a ‘parking station’ that year.

Down the street is a single storey garage structure, that replaced a series of dwellings built in the early 1900s. In 1933 Madame Reo, a clairvoyant (known to her friends as Mrs Ella Evans) operated here. In 1937 Stonehouse Motors moved into their new premises on the corner, and the Superior Plating Works were located down the street, staying here for over 25 years. The Stonehouse Motors service department was located further along the street, replaced in the 1950s by Collier’s Motors who had their sales office nearby on West Georgia.

The largest building on the block today is a church, that started life as a theatre. Sponsored by the Ford Motor Company, the theatre was originally known as The Ford Centre for the Performing Arts when it opened in 1995, designed to bring Broadway shows in an 1,800 seat auditorium designed by Moishe Safdie for Garth Drabinsky’s Livent (who declared bankruptcy in 1998). It sold in 2001 to new owners who renamed it The Centre for Performing Arts, and for several years they brought touring shows to the theatre. The theatre’s sale to the Westside Church took place in 2013, although more recently movie and musical performances have continued to use the theatre from time to time.

On the left the city’s Central Library has been built, and beyond the theatre thousands of apartments have been developed, from the early 1990s onwards.

Image source: City of Vancouver Archives CVA 779-E09.31

Posted October 23, 2017 by ChangingCity in Downtown, Gone

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160 West Cordova Street

We have seen this 1888 building on Cordova Street in an earlier post, but we haven’t been able to identify the architect or developer. In the earlier 1902 image Rae’s wholesale and retail could be seen. This 1936 shows the building occupied by sheet metal workers Kydd Brothers.

In 1906 Norman Kydd was shown living in the city for the first time, working as a clerk, but by 1908 Kydd Bros – Harry F and Norman were established selling hardware and kitchen furnishings at 128 E Hastings. Norman was living in The Manhattan, and Harry at 1160 Robson, although they each had suites in the Manhattan a year later.

By 1912 the firm moved from East Hastings to West Pender: both brothers had moved home; Harry to West 3rd Avenue, (to a building still standing today) and Norman to Comox Street in the West End. The move to West Pender prompted an advertisement in the Daily World which gives a good idea of their line of business “A Big Tool Demonstration Tomorrow Night at Kydd Brothers, Limited HARDWARE SALE Tradesmen in all lines are cordially invited to be present. Prominent men in all trades will be here and a pleasant evening may be spent in looking over the tremendous stock of tools now in display that are being closed out before this firm moves to its new store. The purpose of the gathering is to bring men together working in the same trades to inspect tools that are now down from the shelves laid side by side for quick disposal. It Shall Not Be Obligatory on Anyone to Buy – but men expert in their trades will be here to give views on the merits of the particular tools they use and discussion will follow which will go to show why certain makes of tools are preferred over others and why they are used. Old Heads Will Reason With Young Ones and the gathering of tradesmen in all lines in this store on Saturday night will be of splendid educational benefit to those who are interested on the work they do and the best tools to use to do it. Fine lines of hardware and mechanics’ tools are being sold at factory cost; everything outside of association goods. Its a big chance to replenish the tool chest at easy prices because the stock here is to be completely closed out.” Later Norman Kydd would have a retail store on Granville Street.

Norman and Harry Kydd were born in Ozark, Kansas, of Scottish parents, but moved to Ontario as children. Harry’s business career began as auditor for the Armor Packing Co. in Richmond, Virginia. Later he was moved to other company branches, including Philadelphia. He joined Norman in 1907, with Harry’s role as an entrepreneurial salesman. The firm took on the sale of stoves which were installed upon purchase. The sheet metal shop, shown here, was opened in the 1920s. and in 1936, when this image was shot, it was still home to Kydd Brothers, although by that time Harry was the only brother involved in the business. In 1919 Norman had established his own business on Granville Street, and by the early 1920s had moved south, later living in Seattle.

At one time Kydd Brothers employed 20 plumbers, but following a strike in the late 1920’s (where the new wage was raised to $1 an hour), Kydd Bros left the installation market and stuck largely to plumbing sales to both retail and wholesale trade.

A third brother, Malcolm also moved to Vancouver, and became an employee of the Royal Bank. By the 1930s he was manager of the Port Coquitlam branch of the bank, and in the 1940s manager of the Huntington Rubber Mills of Canada Ltd., factory in the same municipality. He died in 1945.

Harry had died a few years earlier, in 1941. He had run for Alderman in the city at least twice in the late 1920s and early 1930s on a platform of honest administration and fiscal conservatism. After the Second World War, Harry’s son Charles was running the company when the commercial division was relocated to the south side of False Creek where they became BC Plumbing Supplies. This building was rebuilt in 1953 as a single storey structure and today is associated with the Cambie Hostel next door.

Image source: City of Vancouver Archives CVA 99-4875

Posted October 19, 2017 by ChangingCity in Downtown, Gone, Victory Square

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500 block Granville Street – west side (4)

Here’s another image of Granville Street; the west side of the 500 block looking north from Dunsmuir in 1910 in a Vancouver Public Library image. On the corner is the Tunstall Block, built in 1902 by D Saul for Dr Simon Tunstall at a cost of $22,000, designed by G W Grant. In 1909 he added two more floors at an additional cost of $20,000. That suggests that our Vancouver Public Library image isn’t as dated from 1910, but probably from a year earlier. The next three-storey building to the south was another designed by G W Grant for Bedford Davidson in 1903, at a cost of $10,000.

The biggest building on this end of the block was the four-storey Gordon Drysdale block, built for his dry goods business in 1907 and designed by Hooper and Watkins with an addition in 1912 by S B Birds. Next door the smaller building to the north was known as the Anderson block, dating from before 1888 when there’s an Archives image of the building standing alone on the street, with the fire brigade filling their fire engine with water outside. At the time C D Rand and Co, the real estate company, operated from the building.

The fifth building down is the Inglis Reid Building, another G W Grant design for builder and Investor Bedford Davidson, who also owned and built the building beside it in 1902. The steel frame is where in 1909 Miss Spencer decided to replace her eight year old 3-storey building with an 8-storey steel framed office, designed by E W Houghton of Seattle.

None of the buildings on this side of the street are still standing: today this is part of the northern block of the Pacific Centre Mall, designed by Zeidler Roberts Partnership and completed in 1990. In 2007 the corner of the block had a radical redesign by Janson Goldstein of New York for the new Holt Renfrew store, incorporating panels of slumped glass in the design.

Posted October 16, 2017 by ChangingCity in Downtown, Gone

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1010 – 1032 Seymour Street

Here are four more houses on the 1000 block of Seymour Street, showing how low-density and relatively unchanged the Downtown South area remained as recently as 1981. We don’t have any records for who the builders of these houses were; 1010 at the northern (left hand) end of the row appears on the 1901 insurance map. The others were all built around

In 1905 the resident of 1010 was shown as Hill Peppard, speculator, although elsewhere in the same publication he’s described as a horse dealer. By 1908 all four houses were occupied: Waldron Edgecombe, a bookkeeper lived at 1010, Norman Thomas, foreman was at 1022, Thomas Smirl,  a millwright was at 1026, and Rose McDade was running a rooming house at 1032. From the frequent name changes it seems likely that some of the houses were rented; in 1911 Mrs Emma Walch lived at 1010, Norman Reynolds was at 1022 and Mary Bernahrd, widow of Jacob, was at 1032. Only Thomas Smirl was still in the same home as three years earlier. Alonzo Reynolds appears to have been an owner, because he added a frame shop to the building in 1909 (where he operated his business as a cigar maker). Emma Walch was aged 26, and was a housekeeper living with her six-year-old son George. Bother mother and son had been born in the US. In the census of 1911 Thomas was shown as Thomas Smerle, a millwright living with his wife Hughena; both born in Ontario, Their 17-year old son, William, and 13-year-old daughter, also Hughene, had both been born in BC. They had a lodger living with them; Henry Norris. In the street directory Thomas was a foreman at Robertson and Hackett, a sash and door manufacturer with a factory at Granville Bridge.

The houses were cleared and eventually replaced with ‘Level’ – a condo tower that the owners have for the time offered as furnished apartments. There are also three floors of office space in the building’s northern podium.

Image source City of Vancouver Archives CVA 779-E06.35

Posted September 28, 2017 by ChangingCity in Downtown, Gone

600 Main Street

Wayfoong House was built in 1996, and was home for 20 years for the Chinatown branch of the HSBC Bank. They recently moved across Main street, and it now looks as if VanCity Credit Union will take some of their space over. Back in 1973 when Art Grice photographed this corner there was an old building here. Quite how old isn’t clear: in 1903 Dalton & Eveleigh were hired by Mr. Martin to design stores here, but the cost was only identified as $500, so they were unlikely to be the building seen here (unless the figure was inaccurate). As the city’s building permits are missing for a few years after 1903, it’s possible that the initial building was altered, perhaps with the addition of the upper storey.

We make make an educated guess at who Mr. Martin was. Robert Martin owned the Martin and Robertson warehouse on Water Street, with an addition designed by W T Dalton in 1903; he was listed as Mr. Martin for that work. He also hired Dalton to design another building on Westminster Avenue (as Main Street was then known) in 1903, a block north of here. We looked at Mr. Martin’s background when we featured the Water Street warehouse.

A variety of different businesses occupied the space: Quigley and Co, dry goods in 1904, E H Roome’s real estate offices in 1906, J Donald’s grocerery in 1909, J K Campbell’s clothing store in 1910, Krasnoff Brothers in 1912 (when it had become Main Street). Max and Samuel Krasnoff sold clothing in two different location. Max had a legal problem the year before, reported by the Daily World. In the police court Max Krasnoff was charged by the health Inspector with keeping his premises at the rear of 621 Main street in a filthy condition. “The Inspector vividly unfolded a tale of garbage cans and bountiful dirt, the most of which Max did not deny. At the end of the Inspector’s story, Max, who coma from Russia where there are no garbage cans, agreed to do anything that the inspector might suggest. “I’ll do It, I’ll do It,” he fervently replied to the magistrate’ question as to whether or not he would carry out the Inspector’s Instructions. It was on that understanding that he was allowed to go.”

Max retained his store until 1913, but a year later this was a branch of the Imperial Bank of Canada. In 1916 Clement & Haywood, who owned the building carried out repairs, and in 1916 Dominick Soda, a confectioner was occupying the space and seems to have owned it, as Mrs Soda paid for repairs in 1919. As with many of the area’s residents, Dominick was from Italy: in 1921 he was living in Burnaby with his wife Rosina and their children; he had originally left Italy in 1909. In 1921 G Cadona was listed as owner for more alterations, although the street directory shows Joseph Cilona, another Italian, and also a confectioner, although his wife, Leontine, had been born in the US.

By 1973, although Harry James had claimed much of the building’s brickwork for his advertising for his office up the street, Tom’s Grocery occupied the main floor, offering a wide (and broad) range of goods. In the background, on the other side of the street, the Vanport Hotel offered a night out for a colourful clientele, as we discussed in an earlier post.

Image source, City of Vancouver Archives CVA 70-70

Posted September 25, 2017 by ChangingCity in East End, Gone

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