Archive for the ‘Gone’ Category

Powell Street – 800 block, north side (2)

We saw both these buildings in earlier posts. The smaller three storey building that’s still standing today (to the west of the larger building) was developed by former CPR stores manager Richard Bowman in 1906. The adjacent larger building came five years later, again developed by Mr. Bowman. He occupied the upper floors as a storage warehouse, and leased the main and basement stores to a variety of tenants over the years. His son, Oscar took over the business, and commissioned another warehouse on East Hastings in the early 1920s, (although we’re fairly certain it was never built). From 1950 Bowman Storage also occupied premises across the street from this building.

In 1952 there was a significant fire that was captured in this Archives image. We’re guessing that the extensive rebuild needed after the fire was when the windows were bricked up. It’s surprising that there was anything remaining to rebuild; the Vancouver Sun reported that “Vancouver’s most expensive fire in two years raged out of control for six hours and 31 minutes in the heart of a waterfront industrial area Sunday causing $500,000 damage to a four-storey warehouse and surrounding buildings“.  The paper reported that at its height 375 firemen were fighting the fire, aided by the fireboat poring water onto the building from the harbour. “At one point firemen were forced to chop holes in the brick walls of the storage building to release water which had risen to window-sill depth on the second floor“. The newspaper reported the fire in great detail; “A dense pall of smoke hung over the entire downtown area Sunday. , Loss was mostly household furniture stored in the building. It was covered by insurance. Several hundred people had goods stored in the building.” “Efforts to raise ladders on five aerial trucks were hampered by trolley and electric wires at the scene.”

Although reported as a total loss, the building seen in the 1985 image appears to be the exact same as the original. It was eventually demolished some years after this picture was taken. After the site stood vacant for many years it was redeveloped in 2018 with a new storage warehouse, this one designed by Christopher Boyzic.

Image sources: City of Vancouver Archives CVA 790-0877 and CVA 447-171

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Posted January 17, 2019 by ChangingCity in East End, Gone

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Powell Street – 800 block, north side (1)

 

This 1918 image shows Richard Bowman’s storage business warehouse. The smaller building to the west was also developed by Mr. Bowman some years earlier, but this larger building was first approved in 1909, to cost $30,000, designed, built and owned by Mr. Bowman. He built a further $3,900 addition in 1911 (perhaps at the back, on the lane, when we think the whole building was completed).

The main and basement floors were leased to a number of businesses. In the 1918 image there were two paint companies, bookending Copp Stoves, who sold heaters, ranges and furnaces. To the west was Sherwin Williams, a US based paint company founded in Cleveland in 1866. Farquar and Gill, had warehouse space with an entrance in the lane on the basement floor. They advertised as the ‘North of Scotland Color Works’, and were based in Aberdeen. Starting as painters and glaziers in 1818, the founders created their own line of paints, (the first to be supplied ready-mixed) and expanded throughout Britain and across the Commonwealth. Farquhar and Gill’s Colour Works operated until 1972.

On the main floor the last unit, 831 Powell, was shared by Artistic Fire Places and Morrison Steel and Wire Co, the successor to the BC Wire and Nail Co. Harry Duker had the rights to the flank wall, with painted advertisements for Shelly’s 4X Bread, and Black Watch chewing tobacco – “A Man’s Chew”.

Mr. Bowman ran his own fleet of removing trucks, and as this 1918 image shows, if needed, the load extended some distance outside the vehicle.

More recently the site was vacant for many years, but was redeveloped in 2018 with a new storage warehouse, designed by Christopher Boyzic.

Image sources: City of Vancouver Archives CVA 99-185 and CVA 99-5382

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Posted January 14, 2019 by ChangingCity in East End, Gone

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Keefer and Main Street – nw corner

This two storey building was replaced in 2015 with a 10 storey condo building. However, the building that was demolished for the new condos had been effectively rebuilt in the late 1970s as a commercial building so there was no loss of any heritage – or even old – buildings. We looked at an image of that 1978 building, and some of the history of the older building (seen here) in an earlier post. (There’s another from 1979 below). Our 1970 image shows that before it was redeveloped the Hotel Mayo was operating here, promising (rather unconvincingly), ‘modern furnishings’. It had been the National Rooms in the 1940s and before that the Winnipeg Rooming House, appearing for the first time in a street directory in 1906.

The original developer may have been J J Crane. He certainly owned the building for many years, paying for several repairs and alterations to the premises from 1912 into 1920s. He apparently also built on the block to the south of here in 1904. (He hired local builder and developer Daniel McPhalen as architect and builder on that project, and that might have been true here as well. Indeed, it’s just possible that the clerk identified the wrong location for the 1904 permit, in which case Mr. McPhalen would definitely have been the builder).

That year John J Crane was listed as a canneryman, living on Keefer Street, where he had lived since 1891 In 1890 he was manager of the Point Garry Cannery Company in Steveston, and in 1894 the Steveston Canning Co. By 1900 he was running the United Cannery there, and had become a shareholder in the company. When a disgruntled fishing union leader attempted to sue the cannery for damages in a long-running dispute over the price paid for fish, J J Crane was identifed as the head of the cannery. (The court case was unsuccessful.)

Mr. Crane was born in Ireland, and by the time the 1911 census rolled around he had moved to 1st Avenue, (to the $3,000 home he had commissioned in 1908) where he was shown as aged 60, having arrived in Canada in 1880. (In 1901 he had only admitted to being 46). He lived with his 42 year old American born wife, their seven children (aged from 19 to 7) and a domestic servant. One son, Edwin, had already left home, and another, Victor, had died aged 13 in 1909. Mr. Crane’s occupation was described as ‘gentleman’, and it looks like he had retired from the cannery business when he moved to his new house.

He seems to have spent his retirement active in real estate. A 1910 newspaper advertisement identified him as selling land he had previously acquired at ‘a nice round profit’. (In 1918 his home was struck by lightning, which created two holes in the roof, but no other damage.) John Joseph Crane moved home to West King Edward Avenue in the early 1930s, where he died in 1935, aged 85, although his widow, Agnes, stayed on in their home.

Image source: City of Vancouver Archives CVA 447-308 and CVA 780-463

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Posted January 7, 2019 by ChangingCity in Chinatown, Gone

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The Orpheum Theatre – West Pender Street

We saw the first theatre built on this spot in an earlier post. Built in 1899 as the Alhambra, it became the People’s Theatre, and was acquired and remodeled in 1905. In 1906 it was reopened as the Orpheum, with a greater capacity (increased to 1,200 seats) and a new front-of-house, seen here in 1910. It had been bought and run as a vaudeville theatre as part of the vaudeville circuit owned by John Considine of Seattle who was partnered with a New York Tammany Hall politician, Timothy ‘Big Tim’ Sullivan. The theatre ran successfully for several years, but after 1911 the partnership started to struggle to maintain their earlier success. Their main rival was Alexander Pantages, (also based out of Seattle) who ran a rival circuit and was generally more successful in gauging the public’s taste, and so booking the most popular acts. Sullivan died in 1913 after having been declared mentally incompetent in 1912, and Considine’s business suffered.

Here’s the theatre in 1911, in a panorama photographed from close to Granville Street. In 1910 the partnership had picked up the former Opera House, a much bigger and grandiose theatre, which two years later they renamed the “New Orpheum”. The West Pender theatre then appeared as ‘The Old Orpheum Theatre’ for a year, but the economy was in a bad way and the building disappeared from the directories in 1914, with the site being described as vacant. Soon afterwards a new single-storey building was developed here, used as a tire dealership, and then by the Auto Supply Co who sold Dirigo oils and greases, as well as Premium gasoline from a single gas pump embedded in the sidewalk.

In 1929 the site was redeveloped again, this time with a more permanent structure; the Stock Exchange Building. That still stands today as a heritage structure, soon to reopen as a hotel, with a new Swiss designed and developed office tower inserted through and over the older heritage building.

Image source: City of Vancouver Archives Bu P440 and part of CVA 73-2.

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Posted January 3, 2019 by ChangingCity in Downtown, Gone

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Dunsmuir Street – 300 block, south side

The 1950s Post Office is soon to get a dramatic makeover, with retail uses added along Homer Street and two new office towers added on top. Before the post office was constructed there were houses and commercial buildings on a much lower scale. This 1948 image shows that this part of Downtown hadn’t lost it’s small town roots until the Post Office redevelopment occurred.

Unusually, we haven’t been able to trace a single permit that relates to any of these buildings, because they had all appear to have been built before 1901. The store on the corner had two grocers facing Hamilton Street (off the image to the left) which in that year were run by Beare & Co, and Mrs Agnes Close. In 1901 ‘David Bear’ was shown occupying the unit on the end, which had a window on Dunsmuir as well. Actually he was David Beare, aged 43, who like his 34-year-old wife Sarah, according to the census, was an Irish-born Presbyterian. Their children, Evelyn (12) and Henry (9) had been born in the US, so the family presumably moved north, arriving in 1899.

Next door at 302 John Simeson, a shoemaker was resident in the first cottage, a 44-year old English-born Episcopalian who arrived in Canada in 1892. His wife, Edith, was four years younger and had arrived in Canada five years earlier. The street directory (but not the census) also showed Roy Mills, a labourer, living there. John stood for election to alderman as a labour candidate in the 1906 Council election, but just missed getting elected.

John Gibson, a teamster from Ontario, lived in the next cottage with Sarah, his wife, and Alexander Gibson, a lodger and possibly John’s younger brother. Next door was another teamster, Wilson Knowles living with his wife, Annie, and their children Roy and Violet. They had all been born in Ontario, except Violet who was only a few months old who had been born in BC. They had moved west in 1899, and Annie was only 48 when she died in 1919, when the family had moved to East 2nd Avenue.

A larger house used to stand next to the single storey cottages, although it too was only a single storey, and occupied by Robert L Rice in 1901. He was a tobacconist from Ontario, living with his wife Isabel. The next three two-and-a-half storey houses were home to Mrs Runner, a widow, blacksmith Charles Walker and W Murphy, a tailor. There had once been two more houses beyond those, but they were redeveloped with a modest commercial building by 1948.

In 1948 the store closest to us on the corner was occupied by Terminal Cleaners and Dyers, with an insurance office run by G W Lawrence & Co next door. The four cottages were occupied by Peter D M Newall, who lived with his wife Isabel and was a polisher with Acme Plating & Silver. Next door was John S Anderson, (who was retired), Mrs. Clark, (although Melvin Clark, a seaman also lived there) and Mrs. Pettipiece, a widow.

Image source: City of Vancouver Archives CVA Bu P407

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Posted December 31, 2018 by ChangingCity in Downtown, Gone

West Georgia and Homer Streets looking west

We shot this image about a year ago, and it’s already out of date. The building on the left has already been demolished, soon to be replaced by a new and very unusually shaped office tower. It was 418 West Georgia, and we looked at its history in an earlier post. It was built in 1913, designed by Sharp and Thompson, and was initially a car dealership. From 1917 to early in 1919 it was the Stettler Cigar Factory – described at the time as ‘the largest cigar factory west of the great lakes’. In 1920 it went back to being a car dealership, which continued for many decades. In the 1970s it was, at different times, a restaurant and a gallery (in this 1980s image), before Budget Car Rental took over in the 1990s.

Today there’s a vacant lot to the west, currently parking for car share vehicles, that was also used as a car dealership for many years. Beyond that today is the Telus Garden office tower, recently sold as an investment. It replaced a 1950s parkade, which in turn replaced a 1938 commercial building, which was built where Brandon Autos had a gas station before that – and where the First Congregational Church had originally been built in 1889, designed by William Blackmore.

Image source: City of Vancouver Archives CVA 772-832

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Posted December 24, 2018 by ChangingCity in Downtown, Gone

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West Cordova and Granville (2)

This view has already changed, and will soon change even more dramatically. In the 1931 Vancouver Public Library image, the newly completed Royal Bank Building towers over the turn of the century single storey retail, located across the street from the Canadian Pacific station. The bank had acquired the site in 1912, paying $725,000 for the site for their new headquarters. It took them until 1929 to demolish the Hadden Building, (built in 1899) and replace it with their art deco skyscraper – or more accurately, half a skyscraper. It was designed by S G Davenport, a Montreal based architect who was the Royal Bank’s staff architect. Although designed to be built as a wedding cake tower, Vancouver still has only just over half a cake as the eastern second phase was never built. There’s a proposal to add a contemporary tower to the east to define the shape, but not the design, of the original tower. This would also allow seismic improvements to the 1920s building.

We looked at the stores in the foreground in two earlier posts, one in 2012, and one a year later. They were built in 1911 and designed for the Allan Brothers (who also built them) by W P White, a Seattle architect who designed a number of Vancouver commissions in the early 1910s. In 1969 they were replaced by a parkade, seen here a little while ago, and now that structure has been demolished to allow construction of a new office tower that has partly been sold as strata office space.

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Posted December 20, 2018 by ChangingCity in Downtown, Gone, Still Standing

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