Archive for the ‘C F Mills’ Tag

Robson Street – 400 block, north side (2)

These houses were on the north side of the 400 block of Robson to the west of Homer Street. From the picture, it appears that the three closest to the lane were all constructed by one builder, while a small house and the store on the corner of Homer had a different date of development. The houses occupied three lots, so were 75 feet from front to back, as the houses were built at right angles to the legal plots.

Our observation proved accurate, as in 1903 Mrs Hineman (sic) hired C F Mills to build three houses here at a cost of $3,000. A year later Mr Hyndman hired Mills and Williamson to build a dwelling house and store at 401 Robson at a cost of $4,500. We’ve come across Thomas Hyndman, and his wife Alice, in connection with a hotel on Richards Street developed by T B Hyndman a few years after these houses were built. They were still standing in this 1948 image by Otto Landauer, for Leonard Frank Photos.

Thomas seems to have first arrived in Vancouver around 1900, when he was working for R G Buchanan Co who sold crockery on Westminster Avenue. He was recorded in the 1901 census as a merchant, and in 1904, when he was also active in real estate development, he was vice-president of Woodwards Stores. In 1908 Thomas was in real estate, and he and Anna lived at 1075 Burnaby Street (an address Anna was shown living at in 1899 when she acquired 320 acres of CPR land with Henry Hyndman at $3.00 an acre). In the 1911 census Thomas was aged 61 and shown as retired and living at 1220 Barclay Street with Anna, and their 29 year old son, John. A 64 year old English gardener, Richard Buckle, and  a Swedish servant, Hilda Friedstrum completed the household. Both parents were born in Ontario and John was born in Manitoba.

Charles F Mills, who constructed all the buildings, lived on Davie Street. He arrived in Vancouver in 1888, and was married in 1890. He appears to have lived and worked at Hastings Mill for a few years, but by 1894 was living in Fairview and had established his business as builder and contractor. His wife was Sarah Jane, and in the 1901 census he was listed under his middle name, Francis. In that census they had three daughters and a newborn son, also called Charles, and the street directory shows they had moved to the West End, on Pendrell. By 1911 they had moved to West Point Grey, with five daughters and two sons at home aged between 3 and 16, his wife Jane and his sister, Margaret. Charles died in 1919, and Sarah moved back to Pacific and Thurlow. She died in 1947, in St Paul’s Hospital. The Province reported, “She was born in Antigonish, N.S., and came to Vancouver to marry Charles F. Mills. They were married in the little old wooden building of the Holy Rosary where the Cathedral now stands. Mrs. Mills was a charter member of the Vancouver Pioneers Association and served on the executive of the Catholic Childrens’ Aid Society and the Catholic Womens’ League. She was a past-president of the Canadian Social Service Club, and made regular visits to veterans at Shaughnessy Hospital. Surviving are three daughters in Vancouver, one in Toronto and one in Hollywood and two sons.”

As rental houses, there was a constant turnover of tenants in the homes. On the far right is the Homer Cash Grocery; then in the four houses; David M Crawford, a porter with Honey Dew foods, and his wife Jean, Mrs Mary Parker, a widow, Elmer Parker, a logger, and his wife Cecile and Miss Margaret I Beierle, who advertised that she had a room available. By 1981 the site had been cleared for surface parking, as we saw in a recent post. Today there’s a strata Westin hotel, where the rooms are owned by different owners as investments, designed by Lawrence Doyle Architects and completed in 1999.

Image source City of Vancouver Archives Str P263

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Posted April 8, 2019 by ChangingCity in Downtown, Gone

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