Archive for the ‘Francis Donaldson’ Tag

False Creek North (2)

We looked at a view across False Creek a few years ago. That view – of the BC Place stadium and Cambie Bridge has already changed quite a bit. This one is more stable, as much of this stretch of Yaletown is built out (although there are some more distant towers that will fill in the background in a year or two). We first photographed this shot eight years ago, and we could have posted it at any time after that, as almost nothing changed over the next six years. Last year the tall tower on the left appeared, which led us to re-shoot.

Based on the buildings that are visible on the left (and the ones that are missing), we think our before image was probably taken around 1978. The new seawall around False Creek South is completed, but the landscaping had not been planted, so there’s no tree visible on the left. The BC Electric Building is prominent centre left, and the tall (28 storey) tower to the left of that is The Century Plaza Hotel, designed by Peter Cole and completed in 1972, and to the left again, The Heritage, an early West End tower completed in 1970 and designed by Eng and Wright. It was built before the strata act, so is a 99 year leasehold building. It’s pretty much the only building visible in 1978 that’s still visible from this point today, so it was the only aid to lining up the images.

To the right is the cluster of Downtown towers; the tallest white tower on the left of the cluster is The Royal Centre, from 1973, and the tall dark tower is the TD Tower on the Pacific Centre, built in 1972. The smaller cousin of the TD Tower, completed in 1974, can be seen on the right, with the Scotiabank Tower (from 1975) to the right again. Furthest to the right, and looking small because it actually on the Burrard Inlet waterfront on the other side of the peninsula, 200 Granville, is a tower designed by Francis Donaldson and completed in 1972 for Project 200 (the 1960s scheme that would have seen the waterfront transformed and Gastown obliterated).

Today almost all the towers that hide Downtown are part of Concord Pacific Place, designed over 30 years by a variety of Vancouver-based architects. The most obvious background tower is the Wall Centre condo and hotel, now re-clad dark as the developer (but not the architect or the City of Vancouver) always intended. The recently completed tall tower on the left is another Wall building, this one designed by Dialog and offered as rentals rather than condos.

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Posted July 4, 2019 by ChangingCity in Altered, Downtown

Tagged with ,

Canadian Pacific Railway Station

Canadian Pacific were responsible for the dramatic and explosive growth of the city, and probably made the most money out of it as well. The final tower to be built on┬áMarathon Reatly land (Harbour Green Three in Coal Harbour) is just nearing completion. (Marathon are CP’s land company). Back in 1921 the CP Station on Cordova Street was only┬áseven years old. Designed by Barrett Blackader & Webster of Montreal, it was the third CP station in the vicinity.

The first station was built on piles over the beach, and opened in 1886. The second was a gothic castle-like structure designed by Edward Maxwell half a block from this one, and opened in 1898. It lasted just 16 years before this final, grander classical design was completed. These days the towers of PWC Place by Musson Cattell Mackey (2003) and the one tower of the ill-fated Project 200 by Francis Donaldson from 1973 sit alongside and behind the station at Granville Square. Long term, plans call for more commercial buildings around the station and over the tracks – although not, now, a soccer stadium.

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