Archive for the ‘Hope Graveley & Co’ Tag

Central Hotel – East Cordova Street

The building here is called The Central Residence and has been owned by the City of Vancouver for nearly 20 years, but it was built as two separate structures. Each cost $40,000, and 48 East Cordova (the left hand side of the building) was built first, in 1911, followed by the right in 1912. We assume the design of the first, by Hugh Braunton (for W C Marshall) was copied by Archibald Campbell Hope, whose client for the second was the Vancouver Realty Co. They were a business that had been around for a while, but this was their swansong. By the time the 1912 street directory was published the business was no longer listed, and their offices at 433 Seymour were vacant.

We can however provide an explanation for choosing a different architect; the Realty Co were represented by (and probably controlled by) Hope, Gravely & Co, a long-established firm of engineers, accountants and financial agents, with engineer Charles Hope partnering with pioneer land agent Walter Graveley. Charles was from Bradford, in England, and had studied architecture, like his father. His younger brother – the architect of the later building –  was A C Hope, who had been in San Francisco in 1906, and moved north in 1908.

William C Marshall lived on Pacific Avenue with his 41 year old American wife Edna, their two children, and her mother, Susan Darcy. He was from Ontario, aged 48, and in 1911 was shown as living on ‘income’. His wife and mother-in-law had come to Canada in 1884, and William and Edna had married in 1904 in New Westminster. William Crozier Marshall was a widower, which explains how he had a 12 year old daughter at home, Elsie, and an 11 year old son, William, when he married Edna, who was 24 and born in Uxbridge, Massachusetts.

His first wife was Jennie (or Jenny) Loveless, and they had another daughter, Minnie, who was married in 1909 when she was 19.  Jennie had been 19 when she married William in 1888 in Vancouver, and had been born in Burton-on-Trent, in England, but she died in 1893. William had three very young children, so it must have been a relief to marry a widow from Ontario, Frances Chase, (known as Bertha), in 1895 and a further tragedy when she also died, in 1901. She was recorded in the census that year, with the children and two lodgers. The local press reported the nature of her death. “Well Known Lady Dies Suddenly This Morning in St. Paul’s Hospital. A very sad death took place this morning, the victim being a well known lady, Mrs. Bertha Marshall, wife of W. C. Marshall, of this city. Only last Friday the deceased lady was taken to the hospital, and a day later an operation was performed by Dr. McPhillips, which at the time appeared to be successful. but blood-poisoning set in mid early this morning the lady gradually sank and passed away. Mrs. Marshall had a very large number of friends in the city and was universally well liked. She was 32 years of age and had been married a little over three years. She lived since early childhood in Chilliwack, where her people are well known.

Before he became a real estate investor, William had run a livery stable, with the earliest record we can find for him being a payment by the City Council to W C Marshall, drayman in 1888. His inaccurately named ‘Sleepy Dan’ was a notable member of the stable. He was a frequent winner at the Richmond racetrack, and at Hastings Park. In 1905 he was fined $5 for racing on Cordova Street against Tommy Roberts – who also had to pay the same fine. Residents reminisced in the Vancouver Sun about hiring a horse and buggy from ‘Billy Marshall’ to impress a girl on a Sunday afternoon to take them riding around Stanley Park.

William was elected as an alderman in 1916. He was 73 when he died in 1937; the Province reported his death: “William C. Marshall, 73, pioneer of Vancouver In the livery business, died Wednesday night at his home, 1217 Pacific street He had been ill more than a year. Fifty-two years ago Mr. Marshall arrived from Ontario and, with Steve Tingley, drove the first horse stage from Esquimalt into Victoria. Next summer he came to Vancouver to live and for many years was in business on Water street. Marshall’s livery was a landmark In the old days. Twenty-five year ago he retired. He served as an alderman for several years”. Edna was 85 when she died in 1965.

When they opened the two establishments were used slightly differently; 42 was operated as the Central Hotel. Next door at 48 there was a business on the main floor (in 1920 the Kloepfer Hardware Co Ltd) and the Oliver Rooms upstairs. That was true through to the 1950s, although the Central Hotel had become rental rooms by then, run by J K Fun and Sue See in 1955. The Oliver Rooms were run by Harry and Anne Sherban.

This was one of the first buildings in the area to be converted from market to non-market housing. The work was done in 1973-74 by the United Housing Foundation with Jonathan Yardley as architect. During the renovation, which involved the consolidation into a single property, it was discovered that the builders had made the work easier by already leaving blocked up doorways between the two buildings. Our 1978 image shows it as The New Central. In 1980 the City of Vancouver, as owners since 1986, added a fire alarm system throughout the building. In private ownership it had 131 tiny rooms; today, as the Central Residence following a 2003 renovation (following two fires in rooms) the building was reconfigured with CMHC and BC Housing funds to create 64 larger units, 54 with their own bathrooms. Residents are 55+ or under 55 with a disability, although the building is not wheelchair accessible.

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