Archive for the ‘Maclure & Fox’ Tag

Main and Keefer Street – sw corner

This rather uninspiring corner shot was reportedly taken by Walter E Frost in 1971. It shows a part of Chinatown that has seen two new building erected since then on this spot. Very soon after the picture was taken the corner was cleared and the Mandarin Centre, a casino and retail building, was developed by Faye & Dean Leung. In 2016 Westbank’s 17 storey residential replacement was completed, designed by W T Leung (as far as we know, no relation to Faye or Dean).

The corner structure seems to have cost $459 to build: designed by George Giepel for owner and builder A Damascas. There’s nobody of that name in any street directory around that time, but there was a Greek family called Damaskes with three brothers, recorded as Agisbie, Antoniy and Asiyer. They didn’t show up in the street directory because they were all lodgers with Petter Collos, another Greek, with a house on Columbia Street. The ‘architect’ is also impossible to find anywhere in the city, as well. The first occupants of the building appear to have been the Parisian Dye Works.

On the far left hand edge, the single storey, but more substantial brick building was designed by Maclure & Fox for Temple Godman, costing $7,000 for Baynes and Horie to construct. We’ve noted in an earlier post that we think this was Richard Temple Godman who liked to use the classy architects for relatively mundane projects.

Image source: City of Vancouver Archives CVA 447-386

Advertisements

Posted September 21, 2017 by ChangingCity in Chinatown, Gone

Tagged with

Granville Street north from Helmcken

Granville & Helmcken north

Here’s another of the unidentified Archives images. Like others we’ve looked at where there’s no location or date, so we’re slething out an identification. The location is easy – the street sign has been flipped round, but even the building on the corner is the same.  It looks as if it was vacant then; today it’s one of the few remaining XXX Adult stores on Granville – or anywhere else. The building dates back to 1909. Originally the single storey retail on the corner was built with 125 foot of frontage (the 75 feet to the north were redeveloped with 3 floors in 1960). Maclure and Fox were the architects for T Godman, and the whole development cost $20,000. We’re pretty certain that the developer was Richard Temple Godman, a London businessman from a military family. He was in partnership with a Vancouver-based broker, and built a couple of other investment properties here; he also seems to have had interests in San Francisco which he visited several times, and the Godman family had built the earliest buildings in Port Renfrew on Vancouver Island, and operated a cannery there.

In terms of dating the image, that’s a Mark 2 Ford Cortina (1967-1970), so we’re at the end of the 1960s or early in the 1970s. There’s no sign of the Scotiatower in the Vancouver Centre, so it’s before 1975, and the sign on the Vancouver block was removed in 1974, so it’s earlier than that. When it was removed it read ‘Birks’ – the ‘Gulf’ version was a year or two earlier, so this is probably somewhere in the first few years of the 1970s.

In the older image today’s Templeton restaurant was the Fountain Café – ‘Chinese food, fish and chips, steaks and chops’. It was Adele’s Cafe in 1934, in 1956 it was sold to Top Chef Cafe and renamed Top Tops and it became the Templeton in 1996. There a mural on the end wall by artist and activist Bruce Eriksen which dates from the late 1960’s. Leslies Grocery was Sunny Grocery – but the 7up sign was the same one. Q Carpets and Interiors had a huge sign, competing with Belmont Furniture across the street in the Glenaird Hotel – now a backbacker’s hostel. Behind it the Capitol condo tower has filled in a big chunk of sky, replacing the Capitol Theatre. Nobody in the early 1970s was listening to music, or checking their phone as they crossed the street.

Image source: City of Vancouver Archives CVA 800-2102

Posted August 1, 2016 by ChangingCity in Altered, Downtown

Tagged with

West Hastings from Homer – north side (1)

Hastings from Homer 1

Here’s a view of the north side of the 400 block of West Hastings around 1910, looking at the corner with Homer Street. On the corner (on the right of the picture) was A E McMillan’s ‘Head Quarters for Diamonds’. Next door in the same building was a branch of the Dominion Bank, while the building to the west was home to Johnston’s Big Shoe House and Ladywares American corsets. Next door is the Lady Stephen Block – later known as the McMillan Building (although as the photo shows, McMillan’s were originally located next door). We’ve looked at the building already – it’s one of the earliest in the city still standing today, designed by T C Sorby in 1887. It was once obscured by a contemporary façade, but has since been restored.

The same cannot be said for the corner block. Underneath the mirror glass is at least the frame of the 1905 building designed by Maclure and Fox for Stephen Jones. The only Stephen Jones in Vancouver at the time was a sawyer, and it seems unlikely he was the investor. There was a Stephen Jones in Victoria who is a much more likely candidate. He was a hotel keeper – but also a real estate investor, both in Vancouver and Victoria. A 1933 obituary notice included the following: “For forty-three years Mr. Jones had operated the Dominion Hotel which he took over from his father, expanding it as the city grew. The successful operation of the hotel was the basis of the Jones fortune, but it was added to from the first of the century when downtown real estate in Vancouver, which Mr. Jones had acquired when Granville Street was only a trail through stumps, became valuable.” Mr. Jones was born in Ontario into an Irish family, but they moved to Victoria when he was an infant. He was a prominent Freemason as well as being active in both local politics and the Chamber of Trade in Victoria.

Image source: City of Vancouver Archives LGN 560

Posted June 2, 2014 by ChangingCity in Altered, Downtown

Tagged with , ,