Archive for the ‘Stantec Architecture’ Tag

Dunsmuir and Granville – se corner

Here’s the south-east corner of Granville and Dunsmuir, which today has a restaurant behind the preserved heritage facade of the former BC Electric Showroom. It was designed by Hodgson and Simmons and completed in 1928 for BC Electric who used the building as a showcase for modern domestic electrical appliances. The design is an interesting combination of modern box, with the windows forming the main attraction, but at the same time includes classical details like the ornate bronze window surrounds and the second floor balconies.  Architectura, who became Stantec Architecture, supervised the 2006 restoration.

The photograph on the left shows the same corner in 1927 – so the new building didn’t replace a one-storey retail kiosk, but a substantial building in its own right. The Browning Block, built by J M Browning was designed by G W Grant and completed in 1894. Browning was on City Council in 1890 with David Oppenheimer as Mayor. He was CPR land commissioner, was described as ‘very Scotch’, and built a house in 1888 where the Royal Centre sits today.

Image source: City of Vancouver Archives Bu P634

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Granville north from Georgia

Here’s a shot of the 600 block of Granville Street from the corner with West Georgia seen in a 1906 Vancouver Public Library image. The traffic is still driving on the left, and way down at the end of the street you can see the Canadian Pacific station buildings. The 500 block had a variety of businesses, including some apartments just up the hill from Pender Street, the First Church of Christ Christian Science Hall and the Bank of Montreal.

The 600 block had offices occupied by several physicians, the Grotto Billiard Hall, the Simpson Block with a baker and confectioner, the Seattle Rooms and the New York Block (a very early office building developed by CP Director Sir George Stephen, and designed by New York architect Bruce Price). There were offices of tea and liquor merchants and Frances Carter-Cotton of the News-Advertiser, and closest to us the Hudson’s Bay Company store. The store was built in 1892 and designed by C O Wickenden, but it only lasted to 1925 when it was demolished and replaced by the terra-cotta covered design still there today, designed by Burke, Horwood and White. The first phase of the current building had been built in 1912 on the Seymour and Georgia corner.

The rest of the block today contains The Hudson, a massive condo building with over 400 suites and some retail space below, designed by Stantec Architecture. It incorporates the facades of the 1892 Hunter Brothers block and the BC Electric Showroom by Hodgson and Simmonds from 1928.

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