Archive for the ‘Swinburne Annandale Kayll’ Tag

999 Seymour Street (2)

In 1926 (or thereabouts) a new car service and parts building designed by Swinburne Annandale Kayll was developed by Boultbee Ltd. Later Clarke Simpkins, owner of the city’s largest Ford dealership, took the building over and used it as his parts and a service facility. By the early 1960s that use had ceased, and in 1963 the building took on a new life as Seymour Billards, owned by Edmonton restaurant operators. Inside there were large charcoal drawings of famous pool players on the walls, with a small snack bar at the back. It was a big space, with 36 full-sized, 6 x 12-foot Brunswick round-cornered tables. Outside was one of the city’s fabulous neon signs, with three sequentially lit ‘9’ balls (to signal the address) above a revolving ‘Seymour Billiards’ name.

By 1981 when these pictures were taken there were fewer patrons for the hall. A Ford dealership (Dominion Motors) was still on the block, but in the former Vancouver Motors building to the north. That too converted to a different use more recently, as Staples office supplies, with office space on the upper floors. The billiards use eventually closed in 1999, and after a period as a parking lot, a new condo building designed by Acton Ostry Architects was completed in 2014.

Image sources: City of Vancouver Archives CVA 779-E03.06A and CVA 779-E03.05A

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Posted March 14, 2019 by ChangingCity in Downtown, Gone

Tagged with ,

999 Seymour Street (1)

This corner of Seymour and Nelson was developed as an auto parts and service business in 1926. Up to then there were houses here, one on the corner built before 1900, and two more to the north built in the early 1900s. William W Boultbee was president, and Herbert N Boultbee vice-president of the company who built the new garage, and they hired Swinburne Annandale Kayll to design the $10,000 building, built by Robert McCoubrey. Kayll was from Manitoba, initially working for several local architects before training in Philadelphia and then fighting in the First World War. He returned to the city in 1919, and practiced with Max Downing, designing Leckie’s warehouse on Water Street in the early 1920s. He was working solo again when he designed the garage.

The Boultbee business imported a variety of named auto parts, mostly from Britain, and offered to service your vehicle using those parts. The founders were brothers; two of a family of ten children. Their father, John Boultbee, brought his family west from Ancaster in Ontario in 1882, and was a signatory to the Petition for Incorporation for Vancouver, and the city’s first Police Magistrate. William, like his father, was also born in Ancaster, but Herbert (who was eight years younger than his brother) was born in Vancouver in 1887.

Both brothers worked for C Gardiner Johnson and Co (shipping agents), and in 1913 Herbert became the managing director, and William the president of the Boultbee-Johnson Company. William had a variety of other interests, including, towards the end of his life, a significant share in the Bralorne gold mine that produced four million ounces of gold over a 40 year period.

By 1944 (above) the building had been given a makeover, and some of the glazing had changed. Herbert Boultbee continued to run the business; William died in California in 1936. A few years after this picture, the business moved to 1025 Howe Street and Clarke Auto Supply moved in. They morphed into Clarke Simpkins, run by Ford of Canada vice-president Clarke Simpkins. He opened his dealership in 1946 to take advantage of a four-year wartime production hiatus that created a frantic demand for vehicles. His showroom was on West Georgia Street with several other dealerships, as we have seen in earlier posts. This building (seen below in 1948) was used as the repair department until the 1960s.

Today 999 Seymour is a condo building designed by Acton Ostry, completed in 2014.

Image Sources: VPL and City of Vancouver Archives CVA 1184-1546

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